General Election

2019 Australia election: Polls open for 'generational' vote

PM Scott Morrison says he has united his conservative government in the nine months since he replaced Malcolm Turnbull.

Labor opposition leader Bill Shorten has pressed his case with stark policy alternatives.

Australia has mandatory voting and a record 16.4 million enrolled voters.

The nation holds elections every three years, but no prime minister has succeeded in serving a full term since 2007.

No clear winner in Israeli election, exit polls indicate

The centrist Blue and White alliance of former military chief Benny Gantz was projected to win 36 or 37 seats, with the Likud party of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on 33 to 36.

Both men have claimed victory.

Two exit polls predicted that right-wing parties allied to Mr Netanyahu were more likely to be able to form a governing coalition.

But a third exit poll predicted that the bloc would be tied with centre-left parties allied to Mr Gantz.

Election day arrives in Solomon Islands

Polls opened at 7am in Solomon Islands for the National General Election.

There are 333 candidates contesting 50 seats in parliament and over 350,000 registered voters.

The Electoral Commission said everything was in place for the ballot but it said voters should make sure they attended the correct polling stations.

Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday night, the police commissioner, Matthew Varley, urged Solomon Islanders to behave responsibly and vote wisely.

Tongans head to the polls this morning

Some 59,000 people have registered to vote in the general election, including on the supplementary roll.

There are 86 candidates contesting the 17 People's Representatives seats in parliament. Nine nobles representatives will also be elected.

New Zealand to vote on 23 September

Announcing the date this afternoon, Mr English said National will take nothing for granted in its campaign and that the economy was always the central election issue.

The PM was not ruling out working with NZ First after the 2017 election, but said it was "unlikely".

He said his preference was to continue working with current partners - Act, United Future and the Māori Party.

"Together our parties have provided a stable and successful government at a time of great uncertainty in many parts of the world," said Mr English.