HIV

Antibody holds back man's HIV for 10 months

He was one of 18 people in a small trial testing injections of "broadly neutralising antibodies" - the natural weapons of the immune system.

They delayed the resurgence of the virus in other participants by around two weeks.

The findings are being presented at the ninth International Aids Society Conference on HIV Science in Paris.

The human body is inefficient at making antibodies that neutralise HIV.

Only one in five people infected with the virus develops them - and even then it takes many years and high levels of uncontrolled virus.

Rare case of 9-year-old in HIV remission for years -- without drugs

This is the first reported case of a child controlling their HIV infection without drugs in Africa and the third known case globally.

Soon after diagnosis, the child was placed on antiretroviral treatment, or ART, for 40 weeks, at which point treatment was stopped and the child's health was monitored.

Blood tests in late 2015 revealed the child is in HIV remission, meaning levels of the virus in the blood are undetectable using standard tests. Subsequent testing of samples dating back to the child's infancy confirm remission was achieved soon after treatment was stopped.

'Trump doesn't care about HIV,' say advisers who resigned

"We cannot ignore the many signs that the Trump Administration does not take the on-going epidemic, or the needs of people living with HIV, seriously," wrote Scott Schoettes, the HIV project director for Lambda Legal, a civil rights organization focused on the LGBT community and people living with HIV. Schoettes was appointed to the advisory council during the Obama administration.

New public-private partnership launched to tackle TB, HIV and STIs

The campaign, which is being run across four countries in the Pacific (Nauru, Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu), is kicking off this week in Samoa. It will run until the end of 2017, with the initial focus being on TB to coincide with World TB Day on 24 March.

“Public health must be creative. We know one of the best ways to reach people is through their cellphones,” said Leausa Toleafoa Dr. Take Naseri, Director General of the Ministry of Health.

How to get smear test ready

Even so, there's the undeniable fact - it saves lives.

New research suggests as many as 2,000 women are saved every year in England as a result.

But, experts say it could be many, many more if all women aged 25-64 in the UK took the test when invited - which is normally every three years.

"Sometimes women feel a bit embarrassed or awkward about the whole thing," says Jess Kirby from Cancer Research UK.

HIV vaccine: Clinical trial begins in South Africa

The study aims to enrol 5,400 sexually active young men and women.

About seven million people in South Africa are living with the virus, which is one reason why the trial is taking place there.

Experts hope the vaccine will be "the final nail in the coffin" for HIV.

The vaccine regime being tested is based on one used in a trial in Thailand in 2009, which had a protection rate of about 30%. Results from South Africa are expected in four years.

Since the HIV virus was identified in 1983, efforts to develop an effective vaccine have proved unsuccessful.

On trial: The man with HIV who says he had sex with 104 women and girls

But some Malawians are asking why only one man is on trial for a practice involving whole communities.

Eric Aniva was arrested in July on presidential orders after he admitted having unprotected sex with girls as young as 12 - and keeping quiet about his HIV-positive status.

Aniva says he was hired by the girls' relatives to take part in a sexual initiation ceremony which they believe "shakes off" the girl's childhood "dust" so that she can enter adulthood.

One in 10 children has 'Aids defence'

The study, in Science Translational Medicine, found the children's immune systems were "keeping calm", which prevented them being wiped out.

An untreated HIV infection will kill 60% of children within two and a half years, but the equivalent infection in monkeys is not fatal.

The findings could lead to new immune-based therapies for HIV infection.

HIV effort let down by test shortages, says WHO

They looked at responses to annual surveys that the WHO had sent to 127 countries between 2012 and 2014 asking about capacity and usage of blood tests that check HIV status and health.

They found worrying gaps in provision.

They warn that United Nation targets for HIV could be missed as a result.

Protein which switches off HIV in cells found by Queensland researchers

Associate Professor David Harrich made the antiviral protein, known as the "Nullbasic", by mutating an existing HIV protein.

Once HIV-infected cells were treated with the protein, they stopped making virus particles.

Associate Professor Harrich, head of the HIV molecular virology laboratory at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, said the results exceeded his expectations."The protein didn't just inhibit the virus' ability to produce virus particles and spread to other cells, it shut it down completely," he said.