Internet

Guess what? The Internet just slipped from the hands of the United States

A vital thing to the internet is the Domain Name System (DNS) and the United States, the creator of the internet, has been controlling it since more than two decades. You can read more about DNS and its working in our article: What is DNS (Domain Name System) and How it Works ?

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US ready to 'hand over' the internet's naming system

The Domain Naming System, DNS, is one of the internet’s most important components.

It pairs the easy-to-remember web addresses - like bbc.com - with their relevant servers. Without DNS, you’d only be able to access websites by typing in its IP address, a series of numbers such as "194.66.82.10".

More by circumstance than intention, the US has always had ultimate say over how the DNS is controlled - but not for much longer.

It will give up its power fully to Icann - the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers - a non-profit organisation.

Largest Niue internet provider to go offline

Under an agreement signed in the late 1990s, Niue sold the use of its .nu internet domain name which funded wireless access for the island.

But the Chief Executive of Rocket Systems, Emani Lui, said that was no longer a profitable venture, and it last month increased its charges for wifi access.

Google heads down new path with On Hub wireless router

Pre-orders for the $199 wireless router, called OnHub, can be made beginning Tuesday at Google's online store, Amazon.com and Walmart.com. The device will go on sale in stores in the U.S. and Canada in late August or early September.

Google is touting the cylinder-shaped OnHub as a leap ahead in a neglected part of technology.

The Mountain View, California, company is promising its wireless router will be sleeker, more reliable, more secure and easier to use than other long-established alternatives made by the Arris Group,

China says it has arrested 15,000 people for cybercrimes

Police throughout the country have investigated more than 7,400 cases of possible cybercrimes, including hacking, online fraud and illegal sale of personal information, resulting in 15,000 arrests, the ministry said. It did not say when the arrests were made.

Authorities launched a six-month special operation to clean the Internet in July, but some of the cases date back as far as December.