schools

All schools ordered to close in Solomon Islands

The Solomon Star reported the permanent secretary of the Ministry of Education, Franco Rodie issued the directive, as part of the country's Covid-19 response strategy.

Dr Rodie said the mass repatriation of people from the capital to their home provinces following the declaration of a State of Public Emergency last week was causing anxiety and confusion for schools and education authorities.

Because of this Dr Rodie ordered all schools to close with a tentative return date set for the 27th of April.

Tonga announces measures to minimise disruption to education in response to Covid-19

The stakeholders met this week and discussed the global spread of coronavirus and the likelihood of Tongan people getting infected due to mass gathering.

A statement said the meeting agreed to postpone the 2020 Secondary Schools’ Intercollege Sports, which was planned to be held 21-24 April until after the National Examinations in November.

Starting Monday, 23 March all Government schools will add an extra hour to their timetable per day, finishing at 4:30pm instead of 3:30pm.

Tonga govt say World Bank responsible for Gita delays

The lack of progress, which has left a number of schools still using tents as classrooms 17 months after the cyclone, has been drawing criticism in recent weeks.

The government has rejected the accusations and its spokesperson, Lopeti Senituli, says the government has had no control over the hold up, but it has been assured repairs to the schools will start soon.

American Samoans to be kept out of school if not vaccinated

In December a two month old child from New Zealand was admitted to LBJ Hospital with symptoms of the disease.

The Department of Health is driving a campaign to promote immunisation after recent cases were recorded in the Northland region of New Zealand

Medical Director Joseph Tufa said parents should make sure their children are protected from the potentially deadly disease.

The department has asked parents to provide proof that their children have received the meningococcal vaccine and booster shot.

Digicel partners with Talitha Project to stop cyber bullying

There are consultations at all levels amongst Government and stakeholders to ensure everyone plays their part for a safer and more secure online experience for all. 

With that in mind, Digicel Tonga Ltd in partnership with Talitha Project is inviting all schools in Tongatapu to participate in an awareness competition this month. 

The main objective is to ‘stop cyber bullying’ and create an awareness amongst the community with the focus to educate children about a safer online experience. 

Zombie crime scene helping kids learn about science

The amateur detective program was designed by teachers at Penrith Valley School, a facility for children with behavioural problems or complex emotional needs who have struggled with mainstream learning.

"A lot of them have had a lot of poor experiences in the classroom so they've got an expectation of failure that they're bringing in," principal Nic Danta said.

"And so the first stage is just to re-build that trust and connect them with education."

'Why compulsory sex education is important to faith schools and LGBTQ pupils'

Campaigners are celebrating the ruling, saying giving more children access to sex and relationship information from an early age will be beneficial.

It means faith schools, where sex education has previously been limited, will now teach pupils about sex.

However, parents will still be able to opt children out of these classes.

The ruling is "really important" as it will equip young people with essential information on sex and relationships, Laura Hannah, the education and training manager for leading UK sexual health charity Brook, says.

Back to school: Know the signs it is time to get your child's eyes tested

Andrew Hogan of Optometry Australia sees a lot of children in his practice in Hobart, often when parents or teachers notice one of those symptoms.

"Kids won't complain about blurry vision," he told Helen Shield on ABC Radio Hobart.

"Kids who aren't paying attention [in class], sometimes it's simply because they can't see and they don't realise that everyone else can see, because they've got nothing to compare it to."

Tongan Media Bleep II: School-Boy Brawl a “Hate” Crime - Op Ed

In Part II of this sad Tongan saga, we will explore alternative solutions, for Tongan authorities and school administrators have failed to end the violence. 

It’s time for new Tongan laws against “hate” crimes. But the Tongan media, authorities, and school administrators are in denial to call it for what it is: acceptance of “violence” in Tongan society of assault and battery; wife and children abuse; excessive capital punishments in schools, and equating abusive habits with affectionate metaphors.  

School programme needed for overseas born Tongans - report

The report was submitted to parliament by La Trobe University's Helen Lee.

Professor Lee says overseas Tongans often struggle culturally, are sometimes ridiculed and encounter violence more frequently than they might at home.