Texas

No survivors in hot air balloon crash

The balloon may have struck power lines when it went down around 7:30 a.m. in pastureland near Lockhart, about 30 miles south of Austin, in an area often used for balloon landings, a county judge and public safety source told CNN.

"First I heard a whoosh," Margaret Wylie, who lives near the crash site, told CNN affiliate TWC. "And then a big ball of fire (went) up. I'd say it got as high up as those lower electric lines."

If investigators confirm 16 people died, the crash will be the most fatal hot air balloon accident in United States history.

Three-year-old girl diagnosed with type 2 diabetes

The girl, from a Hispanic family, was diagnosed in Houston, Texas, by Dr Michael Yafi, a paediatric endocrinologist with the University of Texas. In a written presentation to the European Association for the Study of Diabetes conference in Stockholm, Yafi said she had been brought to his clinic because she was obese.

The girl weighed 35kg (5st 7lbs), putting her in the heaviest 5% of children her age. She was also in the top 5% for height and body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity.

Brother of athlete questions why he was killed by police

He is puzzled by security footage showing the unarmed 19-year-old breaking into a car and crashing his vehicle into the glass showroom wall.

The confrontation with officers that resulted in Christian Taylor's death early Friday wasn't captured on video because the showroom in Arlington has no interior surveillance cameras and the city's police officers don't wear body cameras.

Texas police: 5 children, 3 adults found dead inside home

Deputies were called to a home in the 2200 block of Falling Oaks Road about 9 p.m. Saturday to perform a welfare check, Harris County Sheriff spokesman Thomas Gilliland told KHOU-TV . Gilliland said deputies subsequently received information indicating that a man inside the home was wanted on a warrant for aggravated assault on a family member.