Zimbabwe

Garamuts thumped in world cup opener

After a rain delayed start, Zimbabwe won the toss electing to field first at Lincoln No.3, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Garamuts openers, Simon Atai (14) and Igo Mahuru (26), steadied along to put on 41 runs for the first wicket.

The Garamuts were dealt another blow losing captain Vagi Karaho who managed one run before being given out leg before wicket off the bowling of Wesley Madhevere.

Ovia Sam (24*) and Sinaka Arua (18) tried to get things going again.

Proteas thrash pitiful Zimbabwe

The tourists resumed at 30-4 on day two in reply to 309-9 declared and were forced to follow-on by AB de Villiers after collapsing to 68 all out - their fifth-lowest Test total - in Port Elizabeth, where Morne Morkel took 5-21.

Zimbabwe threatened to salvage some pride in their second innings, but folded from 75-1 to 121 all out to suffer an emphatic defeat in just five sessions of the lone Test.

Two Zimbabwe ministers fired after two days

Critics said the original line-up showed Mr Mnangagwa had no plans to bring real change to the country despite hailing a "new democracy".

The education and labour ministers have now been replaced, ostensibly to comply with a constitutional provision.

But military chiefs remain in charge of the foreign affairs and land portfolios.

Ten days ago Mr Mnangagwa returned from exile following the military coup against Robert Mugabe, promising to serve all citizens equally.

Zimbabwe's Mnangagwa offers amnesty for funds stashed abroad

In a statement, he said the government will prosecute those who fail to comply when the amnesty ends in February.

"Such malpractices constitute a very serious economic crime against the people of Zimbabwe," Mr Mnangagwa said.

Since taking office last week, he has pledged to crack down on corruption.

"Huge sums of money and other assets" have been "illegally externalised by certain individuals and corporates," the president said in a statement.

Mugabe cried, claimed he was 'betrayed'

President Emmerson Mnangagwa, a former loyalist, was sworn in on Friday and attention is focused on whether he will name a broad-based government or select figures from Mugabe's era.

The Standard newspaper quoted sources within Mr Mugabe's inner circle as saying the devout Catholic held a rosary as he told his close associates and a team of negotiators at his 'Blue House' Harare mansion that he was resigning. He announced the decision as parliament heard a motion to impeach him.

"He looked down and said 'people were chameleons'," one of the sources was quoted as saying.

Zimbabwe latest: Mugabe 'let wife Grace usurp power'

The motion is now due to be presented to parliament on Tuesday.

Senior party member Paul Mangwana said the process could take as little as two days to complete, and President Mugabe could be removed by Wednesday.

A deadline set by Zanu-PF for his resignation passed on Monday.

Separately, military leaders said they had planned a "roadmap" for Mr Mugabe's future, and that the ousted former vice-president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, would return to the country soon.

Zimbabwe's ruling party sacks Robert Mugabe as leader

Zanu-PF has also given Mr Mugabe, 93, until 10:00 GMT on Monday to resign as president, or face impeachment.

He is currently addressing the nation, after meeting military leaders who have called on him to step down.

The military intervened last week, in an apparent attempt to block him from installing his wife as his successor.

The first lady, Grace Mugabe, and several other senior officials have been expelled from the party altogether.

Tens of thousands of Zimbabweans attended street protests on Saturday, demonstrating against the Mugabes.

Ruling Zanu-PF urges Mugabe to step down

The move comes ahead of a protest march to be held in the capital Harare on Saturday, fully supported by the country's military which staged a takeover on Wednesday.

War veterans until recently loyal to the 93-year-old president and liberal groups have also urged him to quit.

Earlier Mr Mugabe made his first public appearance since the takeover.

Mr Mugabe had been under house arrest for days, but attended a graduation ceremony on Friday, handing out degrees.

Mugabe in crunch talks over his future

Pictures emerged of the 93-year-old meeting the army chief and two envoys from South Africa at his official residence in Harare.

The army put Mr Mugabe under house arrest on Wednesday after moving in to take control.

Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai says Mr Mugabe must resign but sources suggest the president is resistant.

President Mugabe has been in control of Zimbabwe since it threw off white minority rule in 1980.

Zimbabwe's Mugabe 'under house arrest' after army takeover

Mr Mugabe told Mr Zuma in a phone call that he was fine, the South African leader's office said.

Troops are patrolling the capital, Harare, after they seized state TV and said they were targeting "criminals".

The move may be a bid to replace Mr Mugabe with his sacked deputy, Emmerson Mnangagwa, BBC correspondents say.