Qantas

Qantas charged in row over Covid cleaning risks

A cleaner was told to stop working after he opposed cleaning practices on aircraft arriving from China.

Watchdog SafeWork NSW accused Qantas of discriminatory conduct for stopping the pay of a worker who raised concerns about exposure of employees to Covid.

However, Qantas said the cleaner was being investigated for "attempting to incite unprotected industrial action".

A union called the prosecution a "landmark for work health and safety".

Safety issues

Australia's Qantas says all staff must be vaccinated

Frontline workers including pilots, cabin crew and airport staff must be fully vaccinated by mid-November.

The company says its remaining employees have until the end of March next year to receive both doses.

It comes as the state of New South Wales reported its biggest daily rise in coronavirus infections.

The Australian flag carrier is the country's biggest, most high-profile company to introduce a mandatory vaccination policy.

Qantas stands down 2,500 staff over Sydney lockdown

The furlough - affecting pilots, crew and airport workers - will last for at least two months, the airline said.

Qantas said it would pay staff until mid-August, after which they could apply for government support payments.

Since June, fresh Covid outbreaks have forced most Australian states to reimpose restrictions.

The highly contagious Delta variant has forced lockdowns in several cities and some state border closures.

The situation is most severe in Sydney. It is seeing about 200 new infections each day, despite being in lockdown since 26 June.

Up to 150 Qantas employees part of gang infiltration at airline

The Nine newspapers and 60 Minutes reported the allegations based on a classified intelligence operation.

The reports said agencies believe organised crime groups had infiltrated Qantas to facilitate illegal activities.

In a statement Qantas said authorities had not raised any concerns.

The BBC approached Australian authorities for comment on the report.

Qantas accelerates cost cuts as $1.5bn loss looms

The Australian carrier also said it would report an annual loss before tax of more than $1.5bn (A$2bn, £1.1bn).

But it added that its debt pile had peaked and was likely to fall as domestic travel was on track to hit pre-pandemic levels.

Qantas said its international division was losing about $2.3m a week, down from $3.9m last month.

Its latest cost-cutting plans include a two-year wage freeze, slashing travel agents' commissions for international flights and offering voluntary redundancies to cabin crew in its international business.

Qantas boss: Governments 'to insist' on vaccines for flying

Coronavirus vaccines are seen as crucial to reviving an industry that saw worldwide passenger numbers fall 75.6% last year.

Chief executive Alan Joyce said many governments were talking about vaccination as "a condition of entry".

Even if they weren't, he thought the airline should enforce its own policy.

"We have a duty of care to our passengers and to our crew, to say that everybody in that aircraft needs to be safe," Mr Joyce said.

He believes that would justify changing the terms and conditions on which tickets are booked.

Qantas to outsource more than 2000 ground crew jobs due to pandemic

Baggage handlers, ramp workers and cabin cleaners at airports including Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Darwin, Cairns, Townsville, Alice Springs and Canberra will lose their jobs.

The move to outsource about 2500 jobs was first revealed in August.

The outsourcing cuts come on top of 6000 already announced redundancies across Qantas' workforce, revealed in June.

Qantas has now cut about 8500 jobs, out of a pre-Covid workforce of 29,000, due to international travel bans and state border closures.

Covid-19 vaccination will be required to fly, says Qantas chief

The Australian flag carrier's boss, Alan Joyce, said the move would be "a necessity" when vaccines are available.

"I think that's going to be a common thing talking to my colleagues in other airlines around the globe," he said.

Australia shut down its international borders early in the pandemic and required those returning to quarantine.

The country has more recently relied on lockdowns, widespread testing and aggressive contact tracing to push daily infections nationwide close to zero.

Qantas ends 30-year partnership with Rugby Australia

The Australian airline has been seeking cost savings because of the coronavirus pandemic, which has severely affected the travel industry.

"While it's disappointing to lose a loyal partner, it is understandable," said RA's interim chief executive Rob Clarke.

RA announced in June that it was cutting a third of its full-time staff.

The airline had already said it was losing 2,500 jobs and had posted an annual pre-tax loss of Aus$2.7bn (£1.51bn).

Qantas flight to nowhere sells out in 10 minutes

And, Qantas believes it's one of the fastest-selling flights they've ever put on.

The airline, which has bled almost $2 billion since the pandemic began, will run a "Great Southern Land" joy flight which will depart and arrive in Sydney.

Passengers have been promised great views of Australian icons like the Great Barrier Reef and Uluru, which are off limits to many people due to border closures.

"From the sky, there are no border restrictions," the advertisement says.