White House

White House, Pentagon miscommunicated on aircraft carrier's location

A senior administration official blamed a miscommunication between the Pentagon and the White House over reports that the aircraft carrier has not made its way to the Sea of Japan, also known as the East Sea, as an expected show of force to North Korea.

The official blamed the mixup on a lack of follow-up with commanders overseeing the movements of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier.

White House to keep visitor logs secret

The White House cited "grave national security risks and privacy concerns" as the reason for its decision.

Former President Barack Obama voluntarily disclosed more than 6 million records during his presidency.

Critics say the logs allow for monitoring of individuals or groups who may be trying to influence policy.

White House Communications Director Michael Dubke said the administration is following a 2013 federal court ruling that found most of the logs are considered presidential records and are not subject to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Sean Spicer apologizes again for Hitler comment

Spicer's choice of words while comparing Hitler and Syrian president Bashar al-Assad was widely condemned.

On Wednesday, speaking at a forum at the Newseum, Spicer called the incident "my mistake" and "my bad."

He said his original comments were "inexcusable and reprehensible."

Spicer brought up Hitler at Tuesday afternoon's press briefing, and then made repeated, failed attempts to clarify.

White House gaffe on Hitler and chemical weapons draws ire

"I mistakenly used an inappropriate and insensitive reference about the Holocaust and there is no comparison," he said. "For that I apologise. It was a mistake to do that."

Critics pointed out gas was used to kill Jews and others in the Holocaust.

Mr Spicer had been criticising Russia's support for the Syrian government.

The White House says Russia has been trying to deflect blame for a chemical weapons attack that killed 89 people.

Trump walks out before signing executive orders

During the signing ceremony, White House pool reporters asked Trump questions about his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who has offered to testify on Russian involvement in the US election in return for immunity from prosecution.

The President ignored the questions and moved to another room, only to be followed by Vice President Mike Pence, who picked up the folders containing the two executive orders.

President Trump's daughter Ivanka to get White House office

But she will not have an official title or salary when she works in the West Wing - the hub of US executive power.

The official also confirmed media reports that the 35-year-old would have access to classified information.

Her role will be to serve as Donald Trump's "eyes and ears" while providing broad-ranging advice, her attorney was quoted as saying by Politico.

Ivanka, who has her own fashion brand, will be joining her husband Jared Kushner, who is a senior adviser to the president.

White House promises not to repeat claims UK spy agency wiretapped Trump

Theresa May's spokesman, James Slack, said the claim that the UK's signals intelligence agency GCHQ helped then-president Barack Obama eavesdrop on Mr Trump was "ridiculous".

"We've made clear to the administration that these claims are ridiculous and they should be ignored and we've received assurances that these allegations will not be repeated," he said.

Senate intelligence panel rejects Trump wiretap claim

BCThe statement from Republican Senator Richard Burr, Senate Intelligence Committee chairman, dismissed Donald Trump's claim his phones were tapped.

Mr Trump had accused his predecessor Barack Obama of wiretapping Trump Tower during the presidential race.

Mr Burr joins a cadre of lawmakers who have rejected the allegation.

Secure White House messaging app found vulnerable

Confide, the secure messaging app reportedly employed by President Donald Trump's aides to speak to each other in secret, promises "military-grade end-to-end encryption" to its users and claims that nobody can intercept and read chats that disappear after they are read.

However, two separate research have raised a red flag about the claims made by the company.

Trump surprises White House tour group

The tour group, including many young children, cheered and screamed as the President popped out from behind a room divider.

Trump called fifth-grader Jack Cornish of Birmingham, Alabama, toward him, gave him a hug, and posed together for a photo. Cornish, 10, appeared to flash an "OK" sign as Trump gripped his shoulders.

"Work hard, everybody, work hard," he said, standing in front of a portrait of former first lady Hillary Clinton.

Trump waved to the group as he walked away.