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Facebook to promote local news in drive for 'trusted' content

"Local news helps us understand the issues that matter in our communities," explained chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on his page on Monday.

The update will initially apply to the US before it is rolled out more widely.

It comes after Facebook announced that it was making posts from businesses, brands and media less prominent.

"Starting today, we're going to show more stories from news sources in your local town or city," Mr Zuckerberg said in his post.

Facebook warned over legal action after revenge porn case

Paul Tweed said he had been "deluged" with inquiries after the settlement with the 14-year-old girl.

She sued Facebook after a man allegedly posted a naked photo of her on a so-called "shame" page.

Facebook has said it takes the issue of revenge porn seriously.

It said it has developed tools to tackle the problem.

Mark Zuckerberg vows to 'fix' Facebook

In a post on his page on the social network, he said it was making too many errors enforcing policies and preventing misuse of its tools.

Mr Zuckerberg has famously set himself challenges every year since Facebook started in 2009.

Social media firms have come under fire for allowing so-called fake news ahead of US and other elections to spread.

Facebook in particular has been criticised for allowing Russia-linked political ads in the run-up to the 2016 US presidential vote.

Facebook grilled on Britain First page by MPs

The social network said it was "very cautious" about removing political speech.

The details emerged as the Home Affairs Committee grilled Facebook, Google and Twitter on what they were doing to combat hate speech.

MPs said the firms had made progress but were still not doing enough.

Google promised an annual transparency report on the issue. Facebook and Twitter said they were looking at a similar course of action but did not commit to it.

On Britain First, a far-right group, Facebook's director of public policy Simon Milner said it was reviewing its future.

Artist’s 'sexual' robin redbreast Christmas cards banned by Facebook

Facebook has blocked the sale of a pack of Christmas cards featuring a robin redbreast because of its “sexual” and “adult” nature.

The artist, Jackie Charley, said she “could not stop laughing” when she discovered the reason the social media company would not approve the product last month.

The bird, with its distinctive red and orange breast, was one of three designs painted by Charley of animals in the snow for the set. The others were a stag and a squirrel.

Facebook appears to axe feed for tracking your friends’ activity

In the most recent development, it looks like Facebook has quietly removed the Ticker, the box that used to appear to the right of your News Feed to summarize what all your friends have been liking, commenting on, and generally doing on the social network.

Facebook is asking random questions to learn more about you

Facebook is trying to get its users talk more about themselves in between all their link shares, photos and videos.

Its newest feature for web and mobile called "Did You Know" asks you random questions to tease out info you might never willingly tell anyone yourself.

You'll find the new section when you visit your profile page, waiting for you to answer a few fun (perhaps silly) questions like who your favorite superhero is, your favorite sport, hidden talent, what day of the week you'd rather be and what your absolute dream job is (Friday and astronaut, of course.)

Facebook creates 800 jobs as it opens new London office

By the end of next year about 2,300 people will work for the social media company in the UK.

The office will be Facebook's biggest engineering hub outside the US, and opens during its tenth year in the UK.

Nicola Mendelsohn, Facebook's Europe, Middle East and Asia vice-president, said the company was "more committed than ever to the UK".

She said Britain's "entrepreneurial ecosystem and engineering excellence" made it an ideal location for technology firms.

Facebook disables ethnicity advert targeting system

It said it would investigate how the feature was being used by advertisers.

News organization ProPublica discovered that the system could be abused by posting discriminatory ads on the social network.

Facebook said it would look for a way to change the system so it could not be used "inappropriately".

Legal action

Last year, ProPublica first discovered the ethnic discrimination via advertising was possible.

US laws prohibit discrimination in the way ProPublica demonstrated - in adverts relating to housing, for example - was possible.

Facebook to expose Russian fake news pages

The social network has previously said as many as 126 million Americans may have seen content uploaded by Russia-based agents over the past two years.

It is building a tool to let people see whether they had followed now-deleted pages made by the Russia-based Internet Research Agency.

The tool will be launched in December.

The Internet Research Agency was behind hundreds of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts and posted thousands of politically-charged messages.