FBI

FBI to investigate death of black man in Minnesota after arrest

In the footage, the man, believed to be in his 40s, is heard groaning and repeatedly saying "I can't breathe" to the white officer.

The Minneapolis Police Department said it was responding to a reported crime.

The incident echoed that of Eric Garner, a black man who died being arrested in 2014.

Garner was placed in a chokehold and uttering the words "I can't breathe" nearly a dozen times.

The phrase became a rallying cry for activists protesting alleged police brutality against people of colour in the US.

Trump insists he's not under FBI investigation

Mr Trump also told NBC News it was his decision alone to sack James Comey.

Mr Comey was leading an inquiry into alleged Russian meddling in the US election and possible collusion between Trump campaign officials and Moscow.

Mr Trump has dismissed the probe as a "charade", a claim directly contradicted by Mr Comey's successor.

In his first interview since firing the FBI director, Mr Trump told NBC News on Thursday he had asked Mr Comey whether he was under investigation.

USA Today asks FBI to fight Facebook bots

Gannett Co has now asked the FBI to investigate, after it estimated that half of the newspaper's Facebook following was automated.

Facebook has removed millions of the fake accounts, but it has detected more suspicious activity since.

And the number of "likes" on the page has fallen from 15.2 million to 8.2 million due to the account deletions,

Brazil jails eight militants over Rio Olympic plot

The men were arrested shortly before the beginning of the Games, in August, after the FBI alerted the Brazilian authorities.

They are all Brazilian nationals.

The ringleader, Leonid El Kadre de Melo, has been given a prison sentence of 15 years.

His lawyer said her client was on hunger strike.

The other men have been jailed for five to six years. All say they will appeal.

FBI: Trump campaign, Russia ties investigated, no wiretap evidence found

Comey also delivered an implicit rebuke to President Donald Trump, saying that he had "no information" to support claims by the President that he was wiretapped on the orders of predecessor Barack Obama.

In a dramatic hearing before the House Intelligence Committee, Comey, once again finding himself at the epicenter of a political storm, also said that Russian President Vladimir Putin had a clear preference for whom he wanted to see as the next president -- and it was not Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

Obama didn’t hack Trump’s phones, committee says

This is after lawmakers trying to investigate Russia's meddling in the US election say they've continued to see no evidence of President Donald Trump's claim that he was wiretapped by his predecessor.

The FBI's decision to brief the Senate Judiciary Committee comes after the committee's Chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley, threatened to not schedule a vote for Rod Rosenstein to be deputy attorney general unless his panel got the FBI briefing he and the committee's top Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, requested weeks ago.

FBI and CIA launch criminal investigation into 'malware leaks'

They told US media that the FBI and CIA were co-ordinating the inquiry after Wikileaks published thousands of files.

These carried claims that the CIA had developed ways to listen in on smartphone and smart TV microphones.

The CIA, FBI and White House have declined to comment on the authenticity of the files leaked on Tuesday.

Child porn case dropped to prevent FBI disclosure

The Playpen site was located on the Tor network which is used to anonymise web-browsing activity.

The FBI found a way around this to reveal the users' real IP addresses and led to 200 prosecutions.

But it refused to reveal to the court how it managed the feat.

The site was located on the Tor network which many people use to browse the web anonymously. It conceals their location and identity by routing their connections through a chain of different computers and encrypting data in the process.

FBI refuses White House request

White House officials had sought the help of the bureau and other agencies investigating the Russia matter to say that the reports were wrong and that there had been no contacts, the officials said. The reports of the contacts were first published by The New York Times and CNN on February 14.

FBI pressured on cost of iPhone hack tool

In the court filings, the organisations said that there was "no adequate justification" for the FBI to continue to withhold the information.

They added that they did not seek information that would jeopardise national security.

The groups sued the FBI last year.

Associated Press, Vice Media and Gannett, the parent company of USA Today, are seeking to learn more about the circumstances surrounding the event.

The FBI has never named the security firm or group of hackers who helped unlock the phone, which was used by killer Syed Rizwan Farook.