Hollywood

Olivia de Havilland, Golden Age of Hollywood star, dies at 104

De Havilland's career spanned more than 50 years and almost 50 feature films, and she was the last surviving star from Gone with the Wind (1939).

The film earned her one of her five Oscar nominations.

De Havilland, who had lived in Paris since 1960, was central in taking down Hollywood's studio system, giving actors better contracts.

She also had a tempestuous relationship with her sister, fellow Oscar-winning actress Joan Fontaine.

Hollywood prepares for Golden Globe Awards

Leading the nominations this year is Vice - a satirical biopic of former US Vice-President Dick Cheney - which has six.

A Star Is Born, which stars Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, has five nods, as do The Favourite and Green Book.

Mary Poppins Returns and Spike Lee's BlackkKlansman have four apiece.

Let's hope A Star Is Born wins something, if only so Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper can recreate the film's excruciating award ceremony scene live on stage.

Was 2017 a tipping point for women in Hollywood?

The #MeToo campaign was groundbreaking: it was both personal and anecdotal, yet also a collective roar by women all over the world, sharing stories of sexual assault or harassment.

They were not just saying how pervasive the behaviour was: it was also a sign of empowerment.

Hollywood has been rocked by the Weinstein scandal and others which followed it.

And many hope it can re-invent itself in a more healthy shape.

Now, a new hashtag, #TimesUp, is rooting the fight against sexual harassment in legal battles.

But cultural shifts can take time.

Time's Up: Women launch campaign to fight sexual harassment

The initiative, which is called Time's Up, was announced via a full-page advert printed in the New York Times.

The Hollywood project is described as a "unified call for change from women in entertainment for women everywhere".

It comes in the wake of sexual abuse allegations by high-profile actresses against film producer Harvey Weinstein.

In a "solidarity letter" published on its website, Time's Up says the "struggle for women to break in, to rise up the ranks and to simply be heard" must end, adding: "Time's up on this impenetrable monopoly."

Weinstein 'derailed my career' Sorvino says after Peter Jackson claim

Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson said both Sorvino and Ashley Judd were "blacklisted" following conversations with Weinstein's company.

Both actresses have claimed the media mogul sexually harassed them.

Weinstein has denied allegations of misconduct, and of blacklisting the actresses.

The Lord of the Rings trilogy was initially in development with Weinstein's Miramax company, before being passed to New Line Cinema.

In an interview with Stuff.co.nz this week, Jackson said he was interested in casting both women in the blockbuster franchise.

Salma Hayek says Harvey Weinstein threatened to kill her

Writing in the New York Times, Hayek said Weinstein once told her: "I will kill you, don't think I can't."

Dozens of actresses - including Rose McGowan, Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow - have accused Mr Weinstein of harassment or assault.

He denies all allegations of non-consensual sex.

In her article, Hayek, 51, a Mexican-American, describes working with him on what she called her "greatest ambition" - telling the story of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo.

Hollywood holds #MeToo march against sexual harassment

The march follows a torrent of assault and harassment allegations against public figures, set off by revelations about the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

The marchers started on Hollywood Boulevard and walked along the "Walk of Fame" to CNN's headquarters.

They were predominantly women but many men attended.

Tara McNamarra, 21, of Los Angeles, told Reuters news agency that the march felt cleansing after years of not being taken seriously about abuse.

Chloe Bennet on name change: 'Hollywood is racist'

The "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." star clapped back on social media this week when she was questioned about changing her last name.

"Changing my last name doesn't change the fact that my BLOOD is half Chinese, that I lived in China, speak Mandarin or that I was culturally raised both American and Chinese," she wrote. "It means I had to pay my rent, and Hollywood is racist and wouldn't cast me with a last name that made them uncomfortable."

Why Hollywood's writers might be headed for a strike

But if the Writers Guild of America is not able to agree to a new contract before May, it all could come to a screeching halt, nearly a decade since the union's last strike that lasted 100 days and carried a billion-dollar price tag.

At issue: The WGA's three-year-contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) is about to expire. Among the Guild's requests are higher pay for TV writers and more funding toward healthcare.

Hollywood in the Trump era

Like many gilded ski towns in the West, Park City is a liberal bastion in a sea of conservatism. Donald Trump won Utah by 18 points, but here in Summit County he lost by 15. Flying from Burbank or Brooklyn to Salt Lake, then by car into the mountains, celebrities and executives were comfortably in progressive territory.