iPhone

'Unlock iPhone', says judge in US sextortion case

Reality TV star Hencha Voigt and former boyfriend, Wesley Victor, are accused of threatening to release explicit images of social media star Julieanna Goddard unless she paid a ransom.

The defendants said the ruling broke their constitutional rights.

But Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Charles Johnson said he was following the law.

"For me, this is like turning over a key to a safety deposit box," he said on Wednesday.

Apple wants to start making iPhones in India

Apple executives met with Indian government officials on Wednesday to discuss a plan to make iPhones in the southern city of Bangalore, a person familiar with the talks told CNNMoney.

Russia wants Apple to unlock iPhone belonging to killer of Russian ambassador

Russian Ambassador Andrei Karlov was shot dead by an off-duty police officer in Ankara on December 19 when the ambassador was giving a speech at an art gallery. The shooter managed to pretend himself as his official bodyguard and later shot to death by Turkish special forces.

How 2016 might have gone, if you could already delete Whatsapp messages

People with jailbroken iPhones claim to have accessed a test version of the app, where "revoke" and "edit" appear as options.

It sounds perfect for the morning after the night before, but at the moment this is all speculation - with no official word from Whatsapp.

It got us thinking how different 2016 could have been if it already existed.

IPhone users hit by 'calendar spam'

The invitations often offer discounts on designer labels, but they are from spammers, not the brands they claim to represent.

Whether the recipient accepts or rejects the invitation, it notifies the spammer that the message has been received, so that more can follow.

Sometimes they take the form of photo-sharing alerts.

Rather like spam email, the invitations are sent at random to huge email lists, and they appear as calendar notifications.

The flaw has existed for a while but has only recently been exploited, particularly in the run up to Black Friday.

iPhone secretly sends your call history to Apple even if iCloud Backups are turned off

However, a new report from a security firm suggests Apple's online syncing service iCloud secretly stores logs of its users' private information for as long as four months — even when iCloud backup is switched off.

Russian digital forensics firm Elcomsoft discovered that Apple's mobile devices automatically send its users' call history to the company's servers if iCloud is enabled, and stored that data for up to four months.

iPhone 7? You're fired!

These are the measures which a small number of Chinese employers are threatening to take against workers tempted by the iPhone 7.

It might not be immediately obvious why a mobile phone would arouse such animosity - this isn't a protest against the lack of a traditional headphone jack socket.

The firms issuing the anti-iPhone edicts are claiming they are doing it for patriotic reasons or to dissuade staff from becoming too materialistic.

Angry guy destroys iPhones and Macs in an Apple store with steel ball

In an extreme situation, few of you might have yelled a bit.

But, this guy decided to take his rage to the next level. Earlier today, after getting mad over some unknown reason, a person walked into an Apple Store in Dijon, France. To everyone’s surprise, he started smashing various Apple products using a big steel ball.

In the video the guy is walking around in the store and destroying iPhones and Macs. The other customers and employees are left stunned.

If you try to measure the damage, it would be around tens of thousands of dollars.

Nintendo shares surge on Super Mario game for iPhone

Super Mario Run will be released in Apple's App Store in December in more than 100 countries.

It will be free to download but users will have to pay for the full game.

Nintendo, which announced the tie-up at Apple's launch event for the iPhone 7, saw its shares jump 18% before falling back to around a 13% rise.

Apple sees iPhone sales drop again but beats forecasts

The US tech giant sold 40.4 million iPhones in its third quarter, slightly above forecasts of 40.02 million.

Apple chief executive Tim Cook said the results reflected "stronger customer demand... than we anticipated".

The firm said it expected sales to fall again in the fourth quarter to between $45.5bn (£34bn; €41.4bn) and $47.5bn.