WhatsApp

Facebook boss reveals changes in response to criticism

The new designs and features for its apps are a direct response to widespread criticism of how the firm protects user data.

Mr Zuckerberg said the company plans to put privacy first.

He acknowledged that there was much to do to rebuild trust.

In a speech to developers, Mr Zuckerberg described the firm's new focus on privacy as "a major shift" in how the company is run.

Some of the more visible changes to those who use the firm's products will include:

WhatsApp and Facebook to face EU data taskforce

The regulators took issue with the messaging app's plan to share user data with parent company Facebook.

A group of watchdogs and regulators from EU nations, known as the Article 29 Data Protection Working Party, said WhatsApp had not fixed issues raised.

WhatsApp and Facebook have yet to reply to the BBC's request for comment.

Facebook bought the messaging app in 2014 and pledged to keep it independent from its social network.

Is WhatsApp being censored in China?

Many reported that voice messaging and pictures wouldn't send without a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent China's censorship filters.

The seemed to be working normally on Wednesday morning, but there have been more interruptions since then.

The disruptions come as China clamps down on online platforms.

 

What was the disruption?

Users began noticing over the weekend that WhatsApp wouldn't send pictures, voice messages and video, although text messages continued to work normally.

How SpyDealer Malware hacks your Facebook, WhatsApp, Web Browser, and other Android apps

Now, the security researchers at Palo Alto Network have identified a malware that has the power to hack 40 or more social media accounts.

Before going ahead and tell you the details of the malware, let me inform you that this malware, called SpyDealer, affects only the Android versions between 4.4 KitKat and 2.2 Froyo. These users account for about 25% of the total Android users, i.e., 500 million.

 

What does SpyDealer malware do?

UK demands Encryption Backdoor as London Terrorist used WhatsApp before the attack

Following last week's terrorist attack in London, the UK government is accusing technology firms to give terrorists "a place to hide," saying Intelligence agencies must have access to encrypted messaging applications such as WhatsApp to prevent such attacks.

WhatsApp must not be 'place for terrorists to hide'

Khalid Masood killed four people in Westminster this week. It is understood his phone had connected to messaging app WhatsApp two minutes earlier.

Amber Rudd said she would be meeting technology firms this week.

A WhatsApp spokeswoman said the company was "horrified at the attack" and was co-operating with the investigation.

Meanwhile, a 12th arrest has been made by officers investigating the attack. The 30-year-man was detained in Birmingham on Sunday on suspicion of preparing terrorist acts.

Signal messaging app rolls out encrypted video calling

The Signal app, which is widely considered the most secure of all other encrypted messaging apps, released video calling feature on Tuesday for both Android and iOS in a new update.

Developed by open source software group Open Whisper System, Signal is a free and open source messaging application specially designed for Android and iOS users to make secure and encrypted messages and voice calls.

Even the Signal Protocol powers the end-to-end encryption built into WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Google Allo's Incognito mode as well.

How 2016 might have gone, if you could already delete Whatsapp messages

People with jailbroken iPhones claim to have accessed a test version of the app, where "revoke" and "edit" appear as options.

It sounds perfect for the morning after the night before, but at the moment this is all speculation - with no official word from Whatsapp.

It got us thinking how different 2016 could have been if it already existed.

UK halts Facebook's WhatsApp data dip

The country's Information Commissioner said she did not believe the firm had obtained valid consent for the move and added that people must be given "ongoing control" over their data.

Elizabeth Denham said that Facebook had agreed to "pause" its rollout but had not met all her demands.

Facebook has yet to publicly comment.

The California-based company bought WhatsApp in 2014 and pledged to keep the chat app independent.

However, in August, WhatsApp made changes to its privacy policy, prompting an investigation by the UK watchdog.

Whatsapp will share your phone number with Facebook

WhatsApp announced in a blog post Thursday that it will begin to share phone numbers and other data on the activity of its one billion users with its parent company Facebook (FBTech30), more than two years after getting acquired.