Iraq

Iraqis try to stay cool in 51C heatwave

The temperature in the capital Baghdad reportedly approached 52C on Tuesday, one of the highest the city has ever seen.

The heat is said to have remained above 51C on Wednesday.

Many people stayed indoors, with some in central Baghdad seeking respite under an improvised shower.

But the extreme heat has put even greater pressure on the country's already strained public resources.

Electricity cuts have left many people in Baghdad reliant on generators to keep fans and air conditioners running.

Rockets reportedly fired at US army base in Camp Taji

An Iraqi military statement said the camp had been targeted by Katyusha rockets.

Sky News reported a missile landed near the camp's gates, wounding a member of the security forces.

Taji is the base where the remaining 45 New Zealand defence force personnel are stationed in Iraq.

The New Zealand Defence Force (NDF) said all New Zealand soldiers at the camp are safe and accounted for.

A spokesperson said the rocket attacks where New Zealand soldiers are training Iraqi security forces are a regular occurrence.

US airbase in Iraq hit by rockets in retaliation

Iranian state TV says the attack is a retaliation after the country's top commander Qasem Soleimani was killed in a drone strike in Baghdad on Friday, on the orders of US President Donald Trump.

The Al-Asad base has been hit by multiple rockets.

The White House is monitoring the attack.

It is unclear if there have been any casualties.

Dutch air strike killed about 70 people in Iraq in 2015

It is the first time the Dutch government has given details of the raid, which targeted an alleged IS bomb factory in Hawija, north of Baghdad.

Large, unexpected secondary explosions meant the death toll was higher than anticipated, a ministry statement said.

Dutch sorties in Iraq ended last year.

The IS facility hit in Hawija on the night of 2 June 2015 was believed to be producing vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (IEDs) used to attack coalition forces, the statement said.

Death toll nears 100 as unrest enters fifth day

The unrest entered its fifth day on Saturday, with at least five people killed in the latest clashes in the capital Baghdad.

The security forces are again reported to have used live rounds.

Demonstrators say they are taking a stand against unemployment, poor public services and corruption.

It is the deadliest unrest since so-called Islamic State was declared defeated in Iraq in 2017.

It is seen as the first major challenge to Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi's fragile government, nearly a year since he came to power.

'More than 80 dead' in Tigris river ferry disaster

Most of the passengers on board could not swim, the head of Mosul's civil defence agency said. Reports suggest nearly 200 people were on board.

The ferry was said to be heading towards a tourist island as part of new year celebrations.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi has ordered an investigation "to determine responsibilities".

In a statement Mr Mahdi said he was following the story "with pain and sadness", and had ordered "all state efforts" to find survivors and treat victims.

Turkish women sentenced to death in Iraq for IS links

Some reports say 16 women were handed the death penalty, while others say one was jailed for life.

The women confessed to marrying IS fighters or providing the group "with logistical aid or helping them carry out terrorist attacks", the judge said.

Thousands of foreigners have fought and died for IS in Iraq and Syria.

The Iraqi government declared its war against the group over in December. While IS has been driven from its major strongholds, militants have continued to carry out suicide bombings and other attacks.

Iraq: At least 60 die in twin attacks near Nasiriya

A suicide bomber detonated a vest and gunmen opened fire inside a restaurant near Nasiriya, capital of Dhiqar province, security sources said.

Soon afterwards, a car bomb exploded at a nearby checkpoint.

So-called Islamic State said it carried out the attacks. Shia Muslim pilgrims including Iranians were killed by the suspected militants.

According to news agency AFP, one report said the attackers were disguised as members of Hashd al-Shaabi (Popular Mobilisation) - a mainly Shia group that has fought alongside Iraqi forces against IS.

Battle for Mosul: Iraq army mops up final IS pockets

An official declaration of victory from the government is expected soon.

Iraqi forces, backed by US-led air strikes, have tried to retake the city since 17 October last year.

IS seized Mosul in June 2014 before sweeping across much of Iraq's Sunni Arab heartland and proclaiming a "caliphate" straddling Iraq and Syria.

But they have been losing ground over the past nine months, as government forces advance on their former Iraqi stronghold.

US-led strikes against ISIS have killed at least 352 civilians

The numbers, contained in the monthly civilian casualty report of the Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, extend through March.

Inherent Resolve is the US-led assault against the Islamic State that kicked off in August 2014.

"We regret the unintentional loss of civilian lives resulting from Coalition efforts to defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria and express our deepest sympathies to the families and others affected by these strikes," the task force said in a statement.