US Elections

Trump in three-state campaign blitz after casting vote

He hopped between rallies in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin on Saturday as he sought to make up ground against his Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

Mr Biden, who holds a steady lead in national polls, campaigned in Pennsylvania, another key state.

Some 57 million votes have already been cast, a record spurred by the pandemic.

The Republican president has continued to hold packed rallies despite a new surge in coronavirus infections that is particularly affecting the Midwest - home to several electoral battlegrounds that could decide the election.

Trump won't commit to peaceful transfer of power

"Well, we'll have to see what happens," the president told a news conference at the White House. "You know that."

Mr Trump also said he believed the election result could end up in the US Supreme Court, as he again cast doubt on postal voting.

More states are encouraging mail-in voting, citing the need to keep Americans safe from coronavirus.

Flynn seeks immunity for testimony

"Gen. Flynn certainly has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit. ... No reasonable person, who has the benefit of advice from counsel, would submit to questioning in such a highly politicized, witch-hunt environment without assurances against unfair prosecution," Robert Kelner, Flynn's lawyer, said in a statement late Thursday.

Russian hacking and the 2016 election, explained

But another Republican, President-elect Donald Trump, is rejecting out of hand any suggestions of Russian influence in the US election, soon after the CIA reportedly concluded Russia acted to help Trump win.

So why is Trump so quick to dismiss intelligence agencies' findings even as leaders of his own party express concerns about Russia's role in the 2016 election? And how conclusive are the US intelligence community's findings?

 

Let's dig in.

What does the US believe Russia did to interfere in the 2016 campaign?

Bipartisan group of senators calls for probe of Russian role in 2016 US elections

The group -- two Republicans and two Democrats -- called for an investigation into American intelligence agencies' conclusion that Russian hacking was intended to help Trump defeat Hillary Clinton.

Donald Trump takes aim at US intelligence community on Russia

In a stunning response to widening claims of a Russian espionage operation targeting the presidential race, Trump's camp risked an early feud with the Intelligence community on which he will rely for top secret assessments of the greatest threats facing the United States.

"These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction," the transition said in a terse, unsigned statement.

"The election ended a long time ago in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history. It's now time to move on and 'Make America Great Again.'"

Clinton to join recount that Trump calls 'scam'

But, in a post on Medium, Marc Elias, the campaign's counsel, said the campaign's own investigation has not uncovered any evidence of hacking of voting systems.

In the campaign's most detailed comments to date on the recount, Elias wrote that while the campaign was not going to contest the results itself, it has decided now to take part in the effort to "ensure that it is fair to all sides."

But President-elect Donald Trump on Saturday dismissed the recount and said that "the election is over."

US Election 2016: Trump's 'hidden' Facebook army

Polls seemed to significantly underestimate his support and few pundits gave him a chance.

But many Trump voters, it turned out, were hiding in plain sight - on Facebook.

Hillary Clinton says she wanted to curl up after election loss

The Democratic candidate said in a speech in Washington DC that she had never wanted to leave the house again.

She told a children's charity that the election had prompted soul-searching for many Americans.

Mrs Clinton won the popular vote but was beaten to the presidency in the all-important US electoral college.

"Now I will admit coming here tonight wasn't the easiest thing for me," she said as she was honoured by the Children's Defense Fund.

North Korea makes first mention of US election result

The first mention of Donald Trump's victory appeared in a news report on a different matter entirely - and then only as a means to attack Pyongyang's sworn enemy, South Korea.

Hidden deep down in a commentary calling for the resignation of embattled South Korean President Park Geun-hye, state news agency KCNA refers to her ruling Saenuri Party making use of a "Trump emergency system" to divert the public's attention away from the current cronyism scandal threatening Ms Park's leadership.